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About Us

Our Building

The Land

The land for the church was donated by James M. Hay.  The original church was built as a log house where the current parking lot is located.  Just 22 feet by 25 feet, the first structure boasted such amenities as split log seats, which were later replaced with pews.

The log church was later replaced in 1854 with a much larger structure, costing $1,600 at the time.  It was built by Edward Sefton, Captain George Hays and Samuel Love.  Heat was provided by four iron coal stoves, one in each corner of the sanctuary.   Electricity was installed in 1939 and gas service was installed in 1942.

Digging

Digging for a basement beneath the church started in 1938.  Most of the digging was done by hand.  The basement was finished and dedicated in 1940.  A manse was built and dedicated in 1949 at a total cost of $13,351.

Digging for a basement beneath the church started in 1938.  Most of the digging was done by hand.  The basement was finished and dedicated in 1940.  A manse was built and dedicated in 1949 at a total cost of $13,351.

Remodeling

The church was remodeled and re-dedicated in 1960.  With about 8,000 hours of volunteer work by the congregation and friends, the cost of the remodeling effort was kept to $40,000.  A new two-story addition was added to the east side of the church in 1967, which featured new Sunday School rooms.  In 1979, additional land was purchased to the east of the church, and a picnic pavilion was built in 1984.

In 1998, the church purchased the adjacent “Miller property”, which currently is rented to tenants.

The People

Pioneer Way of Life

The rugged pioneer way of life was reflected in the life of our first pastor, Rev. Isaiah Niblock who journeyed on horseback once a month from Butler to Clinton Church, sometimes with his wife and children in tow.  Communion observances started with a fast on Friday, a church meeting on Saturday, and the actual communion service during Sunday worship.

The People’s Duty

Early session records reveal the duty felt by its members to oversee the moral and spiritual welfare of the members.

Many changes have occurred over the last 166 years, but Clinton remains faithful to God’s unchanging Word. Today’s Clinton Church membership continues this tradition though discipleship and fellowship.